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Visiting Ohio with a missions group

From the moment we are born, our personality is a part of who we are.  It’s evident even in the earliest hours of life.  I’ve seen it myself in the nursery at the hospital that I work for.  Some infants are laid back and content by nature, and some are already high maintenance with no influence of parenting.  I believe that we are givers or receivers by design.  Sure, the experiences of our life have an enormous impact on the adults we grow to become, and how we are raised is of vital importance.  Yet, none of those things really impact our basic and primal personality types.

I am by nature a giver, and serving others is what feeds my spirit.  I believe that this is largely why I have come to the decision to change my career.  The work that I currently do is vital to the health field, but also very solitary.  I don’t really ever see a patient and never participate in their care.  The work I do affects almost 70% of the care teams decisions, but I don’t feel I am part of the team.  Many patients never really even consider that there are people somewhere (often in the basement) rushing around to turn out quality Stat results ordered by physicians at the drop of a hat.  My work takes a critical thinking mind, a steady hand, fast thinking, and unending patience.  However, I miss the human connection more than I ever expected.

I suppose I should be clear about my position, I am an MLT (medical lab technician) and perform the medical testing on site of the hospital ordered by the doctors there.  Some testing of course must go to specialty labs, and just preparing those send outs is an art all its own.  I do chemistry, hematology, urinalysis, manual testing (think pregnancy test, strep test, things on cards that show positive or negative results).  It goes on and on.  Up until my son was born, I also worked in the blood bank, very interesting work.  I am also one of just a few people who work in the pathology department.  When I work in this department, I order the work, set up the grossing table, assist the cutting pathologist with what ever they need, process bone marrow specimens for interpretation, and clean up.  Labeling all the parts that come across the table helped me to learn more about anatomy and physiology. 

When I began to play with the idea of going back to school, I mentioned it to one of our Doctors.  He was actually instrumental in urging me back to the class room.  I could never thank him enough for his confidence in my ability, and also helping me to apply.  Although I never was given a copy, I know that he wrote me a glowing letter of recommendation.  I can only hope to prove him right.

My goal at the end of the next three years is to graduate with my BSN, and to become the best Labor and Delivery nurse I can be.  When my family is again ready to let me further my education, my next degree will be my doctorate of midwifery.  There is a long road ahead, but I am excited to be on it.  My servant’s heart is ready to serve in a new way, and I am brimming with joy.

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